How to choose a good baby crib

Baby

A baby spends a lot of time in their crib – sleeping, practicing twisting around, sitting and jumping as energetically as if they were commissioned by the manufacturer to test the item’s durability. Here are 5 things to pay attention to when shopping.

First of all, they differ in price, appearance (besides traditional ones, those looking like princess beds are also available) and additional features. Some of them have drop sides, others come with removable rails, then there are those with wheels (plus a brake) or rockers that let them work as a cradle. There are cribs with or without drawers (drawers may have – or may not – a dust-protective cover). Certain products come with interesting additions, like paddings to put on the barrier that will come in handy when the baby starts teething and tries to chew on the crib.

What crib to choose?

That depends not only on the available budget but also on the needs. If you have a small apartment, are planning to have another child (which means a small crib will still be useful) or if you already know that once your child gets older you will get them a race car bed, there’s no point buying a big one (140×70 cm) that can be converted into a daybed. An all-in-one crib (with drawers, a cabinet and a changing station) might be a good idea, but it’s quite large, which means some places won’t be big enough to fit it. A drawer is convenient, but if you have a lot of space available for your baby’s things, it is not necessary. Wheels make it easy to move around, but won’t be useful if you’re not planning to move the crib around the house. And so on. That’s why, before you make the decision, think about what you really want. What matters is that the product is safe and solid.

Size
Typical cribs are sized 120×60 cm, but there are also bigger ones, sized 140×70 cm – once the baby gets bigger, they can be converted into a daybed that will serve the child for the next few years (even all the way until they’re seven).

Workmanship
A baby crib has to be stable – it cannot wobble or creek, and the bottom has to be sturdy – caving in is not an option, even if the baby jumps on it. The product should also be carefully finished. Slight imperfections are not just a problem of aesthetics, but of safety as well: if a crib is not polished properly, the baby might get a splinter in their hand. A baby crib cannot have elements that the baby could pull out and swallow – bolts, caps etc. have to be inaccessible to them.

Mattress 

In most cases it is bought separately. The selection is huge (foam, latex, coconut, spring etc.). Orthopedists recommend mattresses of medium hardness, elastic enough to adapt to the body shape.

In most cases it is bought separately. The selection is huge (foam, latex, coconut, spring etc.). Orthopedists recommend mattresses of medium hardness, elastic enough to adapt to the body shape.


Rails
They need to be close enough to one another to prevent the baby from putting their head between them, and far enough to prevent their hand or leg from getting stuck in them. They cannot be angular. Certain baby cribs make it possible to remove some of the rails – which allows the baby to leave the crib on their own (without trying to climb their way out). Make sure if removable rails are not too easy to remove – so that the baby cannot remove them on their own. One great solution is a drop side – it especially comes in handy during early days – check out if it can be operated with a single hand.

Adjustable

In most cases it can be adjusted on three different levels. When the baby is little and you bend over them a lot, it will be more convenient for you if you set the bottom high. When the child starts sitting up, you may lower it to the middle setting for safety, and once they can stand up and crawl – to the lowest one.